Garage Odors Caused by Crankcase Oil: A Look at How to Deal with Them

One of the many substances that can cause garage odors is crankcase oil. As you might have known, it’s used to lubricate a vehicle’s crankshaft and working components. Many such motor oils are mineral based, which means that they can be hazardous if not handled correctly.

Between new and used crankcase oil, the later tends to be the more toxic of the two. That’s because it’s not uncommon for it to pick up toxic substances from inside of the crankcase and other areas. Examples of such dangerous substances include lead, barium, nickel, molybdenum and boron.

 

Depending on exposure conditions, they have the potential to cause cardiovascular, hepatic, hematological and respiratory problems as well as contact dermatitis. The respiratory problems are obviously caused by inhaling the crankcase oil odors. Those same odors may also cause a person’s eyes to water and or otherwise become irritated.

With that said, if your garage is home to containers of used crankcase oil, it is best to remove them. In most instances, a waste oil collection agency may be able to help in that regard. If the used crankcase oil has spilt onto your concrete floor, you’ll clearly want to take other measures.

In the event of a spill, cover the crankcase oil stained area with a disposable, eco-friendly sorbent. They are generally sold through janitorial supply retailers and auto parts stores. Afterward, you’ll be able to remove the spent sorbent and dispose of it accordingly.

When you are finished removing the spent crankcase oil from your garage, the toxic odors should start to subside. Those odors that remain in the garage or your vehicle after the clean up may be removed naturally with a Newaire, Rainbowair or Queenaire ozone generator. To learn more about them and the process of effective garage odor removal, please contact us toll-free at (866) 676-9663.

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